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Lanzarote Travel Guides

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Lanzarote Travel Guides

Lanzarote was one of the first destinations in Europe to offer what is now considered the quintessential beach holiday. However, Lanzarote has more to offer than just sun, sea and sand. Away from the soft beachy coast, holiday makers will find a wealth of stunning scenery, creative cuisine, vibrant culture and unique indigenous architecture.

A foodie’s guide to Lanzarote

If you love food, then you’ll love Lanzarote. This stunning Canary Island takes pride in its locally grown produce and borrows gastronomic influence from Spain, Africa and Latin America thanks to its historical position as a former trans-Atlantic port. Whether it’s freshly caught seafood, vegetables grown in volcanic sand or unique vineyards, Lanzarote boasts plenty of distinctive but delicious flavours for the discerning traveller.

Freshly Caught Seafood
Being an island, it probably doesn’t surprise anyone that Lanzarote restaurants offer several delicious seafood dishes. Two local delicacies that you’ll see popping up regularly on menus are the local fish Cherne, (wreckfish in English) mero (in English dusky grouper) and vieja (parrotfish). Make sure at one point you also try some Sancocho Canario, a stew made with salty fish, sweet potato, mojo and gofio bread. Fresh Tuna Steak, Calamari and Octopus are also common. If you want to taste the best seafood Lanzarote has to offer we recommend heading to the towns of El Golfo and Arrieta where much of the fish came out of the water earlier that day.

Meat
While locally caught fish tops the menu, meat is also very popular. Goat and rabbit are two meats that are very common and are primarily used in stews. Young goat especially is very popular – and is normally served fried or cooked in the oven.

Papas Arrugadas
If you read any food and drink guide concerning Lanzarote, this local potato dish will make an appearance. In order to get the skins ‘wrinkly’ texture, the potatoes are boiled in sea water and then to add flavour they are served with Mojo, a traditional Canarian sauce made with garlic and herbs or paprika.

Cheese
Cheese fiends are definitely not left out on a holiday to Lanzarote. The cheese found in Lanzarote is award-winning and can be made from goats, cows or sheep milk. You can find fresh, semi-fresh, smoked or cured cheese in many shops and restaurants, however cured cheeses are also sold with a mixture of olive oil and paprika or gofio creating a unique flavour.

Bienmesabe
You might not be immediately familiar with this dessert, but it has been called “the most famous dessert in the Canaries”. Traditionally it is made using honey, egg yolk and ground almonds – but additional ingredients can include sugar, lemon zest, cinnamon and sweet wine or sherry.

Volcanic wines
The vineyards that grow out of the dark volcanic sands have been attracting wine connoisseurs to Lanzarote for years, and have also been awarded Protected Designation of Origin status. All the wines are grown in the fascinating La Geria region, with single vines protected from the trade winds by a semi-circular wall. Malvasia is the wine mostly associated with Lanzarote, and is defined by its characteristic light fruity flavour and are very crisp and dry making it a great accompaniment to the fish dishes that are popular on the island. Other wine varieties found across the island include Muscatel, white and black lists, Diego, and Burra White Negramoll.

Dining in a volcano
Lanzarote locals sure put their volcanoes to good use. In the hills of Timanfaya National Park, lies the El Diablo restaurant that cooks its food by placing a grill rack across a volcanic vent. Then there’s also Jameos del Agua in the north of the island, a restaurant found in the volcanic tunnels created by the eruption of the La Corona Volcano. Every Tuesday and Saturday you can enjoy the Jameos Night and be treated to a la carta dinner with live music.

4 things to do in Lanzarote – that don't include the beach

Lanzarote was one of the first destinations in Europe to offer what is now considered the quintessential beach holiday. However, Lanzarote has more to offer than just sun, sea and sand. Away from the soft beachy coast, holiday makers will find a wealth of stunning scenery, creative cuisine, vibrant culture and unique indigenous architecture. We’ve rounded up eight of our favourite things to do in Lanzarote that don’t involve a bucket and spade.

1. Visit the largest marine reserve in the world
The Marine Reserve of the Chinijo Archipelago surrounding the island of La Graciosa, clocks in at an expansive 70.700 hectareas making it the largest marine reserve in the world. Biologically it is home to 304 species of macroalgae and this has attracted an abundance of sea birds who come here for nourishment. The rare Mediterranean monk seal can also be sighted in its waters.

2. Dine on food heated by a volcano
Foodies looking for a one-of-a-kind adventure will find it at the top of the Islote de Hilario volcano. Aside from offering jaw-dropped panoramic views of Timanfaya National Park and its unearthly red sands, the restaurant is home to an imaginative kitchen. Six metres above gently bubbling lava is an opening with an attached grill, cooking a range of meats with volcanic heat.

3. Admire interrupted native architecture
One thing that sets Lanzarote apart from its tourist counterparts is its lack of high rise hotels. This can be accredited to Lanzarote-born artist César Manrique who campaigned heavily to make sure all hotel accommodation on the island blends in with the traditional architectural style. The César Manrique Foundation can be found on the east of the island and is home to his creations.

4. Take part in a traditional festival
There are holidaymakers who time their holiday to coincide with February’s Carnaval and its flamboyant atmosphere. Usually held in February, this is the same Carnaval that is held in Rio de Janeiro where the streets come alive. Canarian Day is another lively date in the Lanzarote calendar and local hotels get involved with themed dinners and folklore celebrations. And if you’re visiting over Christmas you might receive a visit from the Three Wise Men who are believed to stop-by bearing gifts in early January.